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How to Store Your Wood Glue for Longer Life


“Refrigerate after opening,” and you maximize the shelf life of perishable food. The same goes with a bottle of Titebond glue: Store it correctly – and that could be in a refrigerator – and it can perform well beyond the stated shelf life.

Titebond Woodworking GluesMost adhesives manufacturers stamp an official shelf life on their products to limit liability in case poor storage conditions cause product failure. The stated shelf life of wood glue typically is one to two years. However, the expected shelf life of many glues typically stretches well past those few years. For example, store a bottle of white or yellow wood glue (polyvinyl acetate, or PVA glue) in optimum conditions, and it can last 10 years or longer. This goes for our popular Titebond® Original, Titebond II and Titebond III PVA glues, too.

Bob Behnke, senior technical specialist at Titebond-manufacturer Franklin International, says that a dry, cool basement is an ideal place to keep wood glues. He adds that you might be able to extend the life of your glue even longer if you have room for it in your refrigerator.

“The worst storage conditions allow freezing, then thawing and heat,” explains Behnke. “Most wood glues are designed to withstand a minimum of five freeze/thaw cycles. With each cycle, the glue forms gels. Mixing easily breaks up these gels, but each subsequent freeze/thaw incident will make the gels more difficult to disperse.”

Eventually, you won’t be able to break up the gels at all, and the glue will remain solid. Heat also can cause the polymer to clump and gel.

How will you know if your glue has gone bad? “If it pours, it’s probably good,” says Behnke. If the glue has thickened, shake it vigorously by firmly tapping the bottle on a hard surface until the product is restored to its original form. You also can add up to five percent water to water-based glues (such as PVA glues) to thin the product. If the glue comes out stringy or pasty or wants to stick to itself rather than to the wood, it’s probably past its prime. If Titebond II turns orange, it’s time for a new bottle.

Additional information on calculating the shelf life of a given bottle of Titebond glue and related subjects is available in the Titebond online FAQ section.  We want you to get the most out of your bottle of Titebond whether you empty it quickly or need it to last for many years.

Woodworking Glues


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